Discover your learning style.

It’s important to work out how you learn and retain information best. If you’re someone who learns by doing (kinaesthetic) then choose study options that have strong practical tasks or on the job training. If you are a visual learner, create cue cards to retain information. You can use a varied approach if you find you learn best by hearing (auditory) instructions and having a go. Create habits utilising your best learning methods so that you play to your strengths and make studying a little easier.

Set learning goals.

Having goals can help you stay on track and reach your full potential. Chunk your goals down by starting at your end goal and working your way back, breaking the steps down into smaller, more manageable steps. It’s important to set an achievement date for each step to keep you on track. If you are a visual person, create a vision board focused on your learning goals, what you will achieve at the end, and the impact it will have on your life. You will make decisions and steps toward your goals more easily.

Plan your time or set a routine.

Schedule in time for study, research or project work. Block out time in your calendar to work towards your learning goals and set timelines before projects are due to give you time if the project takes longer than expected. This also reduces stress.

Ask for help.

If you find that things are becoming overwhelming or you need extra help with understanding your learning, reach out to family, friends, teachers, doctors and other resources for help. It’s important to ask for help to get you through tough times. Everyone needs a helping hand at times, and it’s an opportunity to learn and put strategies in place for next time, so stressful situations don’t repeat themselves. Identifying the need for help early can be a way to stop things from really getting out of control.

Find a way to stay motivated.

There will be times when you feel unmotivated; this could be due to a lack of interest in a subject, stress, being pushed outside your comfort zone, or not connecting to what you are being taught. It is vital to find a way to push through these de-motivators, stay the course and motivate yourself. This can be done by making a to-do list and crossing off your list as you go to give you a sense of achievement and sticking to your plan or routine regardless of your mood. You can set reward points, where you take breaks to re-energise or refresh yourself. Find a way to “fill your cup”, do something that makes you feel good so that you can continue on your learning journey.

Prioritise your health.

Staying healthy is essential to succeeding in learning, so look after yourself. Value your health; eat well, and drink lots of water, and exercise. When planning, remember to include exercise into your schedule. It doesn’t have to be a strenuous workout, just put time aside for at least a 30 minute walk each day. The endorphins you get from exercise will help you think clearly and work quickly towards your learning goals.
Reward yourself.

Be kind to yourself!

When you reach milestones, remember to reward yourself. This allows you to enjoy the journey particularly when the learning goals are stretched out over a long period of time. Celebrating the wins, particularly when you have worked hard at meeting a deadline, can create positive anchors for success and set you up to really enjoy learning. Choose something that you love. It could be hanging out with your friends, having a nice dinner, buying yourself a pair of shoes, or just simply having a bubble bath if that floats your boat. Whatever it is, make sure you value yourself and your achievements so you can continue to see your self-worth.